Category Archives: Juries around the world

Article shows that jury service generates positive attitudes toward the courts

A piece came out recently that shows how jury service can boost the public’s attitudes toward judges and juries. The article is: Gastil, J., Fukurai, H., Anderson, K., & Nolan, M. (2013). Seeing is believing: The impact of jury service … Continue reading

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Turning Japanese (and Simplified Chinese)

Just got word today that The Jury and Democracy, the book that’s the inspiration for this blog, is being translated into “Simplified Chinese.” Yours truly confesses to not knowing there was a simple and complicated version of the language, and … Continue reading

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Mixed juries: The case of Italy

We’ve all seen the headlines about the acquittal of former University of Washington student Amanda Knox, who was in her second year of a 26-year sentence for a murder in Perugia, Italy. What may have escaped notice was that the … Continue reading

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Juries in Japan

A new article has come out in the Illinois Law Review that provides a more comprehensive look at the Japanese jury system, which is still relatively new. The new Japanese “saiban-in” or “lay assessor” system has many interesting features: It … Continue reading

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Deliberation, China, and the jury

A wonderful new Time op-ed suggested that instead of appointing commissions to study the debt, etc., Obama should be using deliberative bodies. This particular piece points to the Deliberative Poll variants being used in China (yes, China shames the US … Continue reading

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Modern juries in Russia

Russian juries try approximately 0.05% of all criminal cases and have a 20% acquittal rate, which is approximately twenty times higher than that of traditional courts. Continue reading

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