Category Archives: Deliberation on juries

The problem of skewed jury demographics

Written by Ethan Paul, undergraduate student at the Pennsylvania State University NYPD Officer Peter Liang is facing trial after being accused of recklessly shooting Akai¬†Gurley in a dimly-lit stairwell in East New York on November 20th, 2015. Gurley, a 28-year … Continue reading

Posted in Deliberation on juries, Public/media views of juries, Verdicts juries reach, Voir dire and jury selection | 2 Comments

Jury Duty as a Patriotic Act

On the eve of America’s Independence Day (July 4), legal scholar Andrew Ferguson has a new op-ed about jury duty, which plays up its potential role as “the most American thing you can do.” At CNN.com, Ferguson explains that “serving … Continue reading

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Why the Supreme Court reaffirmed the sanctity of jury deliberations

Open meeting norms and “sunshine” laws help ensure that the public can know what’s happening when government officials meet. But what about when lay citizens are the government? When a jury deliberates together, it does so in private. Why the … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Deliberation on juries | 2 Comments

What happens if a juror is (later) caught lying during jury selection?

This question has come before the U.S. Supreme Court. Previous rulings have made clear that one can’t (generally) use post-trial claims about what happened during deliberation to overturn verdicts, lest it chill the deliberations themselves. After all, the point of … Continue reading

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A global jury?

Penn State University has started a program that looks at human rights cases called “The World on Trial.” The neat twist in the show is that “juries throughout the world” review the case, as presented on the show, then “reach … Continue reading

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Discussing the jury in America with Albert Dzur and John Gastil

Joshua Miller of Morgan State University recently recorded a discussion he orchestrated via GoogleHangout with political scientist Albert Dzur and me (John Gastil). The interview-like-thing runs about 23 minutes and gives you some insight into what Albert and I have … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Deliberation on juries, Social/political impact of juries, Verdicts juries reach, Voir dire and jury selection | 1 Comment

New article shows how jurors decribe their service experience

My colleague Leah Sprain and I have a new article out: Sprain, L., & Gastil, J. (2013). What does it mean to deliberate? An interpretative account of the norms and rules of deliberation expressed by jurors. Communication Quarterly, 61, 151-171. … Continue reading

Posted in Deliberation on juries, Social/political impact of juries | 1 Comment