Category Archives: Conducting trials

Florida Supreme Court: Imposition of Death Sentence Requires Unanimous Jury

Written by Ethan Paul, undergraduate student at the Pennsylvania State University The Florida Supreme Court ruled on Friday, October 14, that it is unconstitutional for the death penalty to be imposed without the unanimous support of a jury. As the New … Continue reading

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Rewriting the 6th Amendment: Right to a Speedy Plea Bargain

Written by Ethan Paul, undergraduate student at the Pennsylvania State University A recent New York Times study, authored by Benjamin Weiser, found that, out of 63,000 federal defendants convicted in 1997, only 3,200 were done so by a jury of their … Continue reading

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Jury Duty in an Online World

Written by Ethan Paul, undergraduate student at the Pennsylvania State University Following a jury trial held in Macomb County Circuit Court in Mount Clemons,Terry L. Wilson, 22, was convicted of premeditated murder and firearm possession for his involvement in the May 2013 shooting death … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Deliberation on juries, Jury structure and reform, Social/political impact of juries | Leave a comment

Why the Supreme Court reaffirmed the sanctity of jury deliberations

Open meeting norms and “sunshine” laws help ensure that the public can know what’s happening when government officials meet. But what about when lay citizens are the government? When a jury deliberates together, it does so in private. Why the … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Deliberation on juries | 2 Comments

More worries about the shrinking civil jury

This blog, and many other sources, have noted the low percentage of civil (and criminal) trials that go to a jury. A recent news article in the Grand Rapids Business Journal offers a somewhat different take than most have on … Continue reading

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An atypical psychological impact of jury duty

“Dear Prudence,” an advice column in Slate, this week responded to the story of a juror whose experience reviewing evidence in a sexual assault case left the juror with memories that stunted her ability to fantasize. The juror had previously … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Social/political impact of juries | 1 Comment

Discussing the jury in America with Albert Dzur and John Gastil

Joshua Miller of Morgan State University recently recorded a discussion he orchestrated via GoogleHangout with political scientist Albert Dzur and me (John Gastil). The interview-like-thing runs about 23 minutes and gives you some insight into what Albert and I have … Continue reading

Posted in Conducting trials, Deliberation on juries, Social/political impact of juries, Verdicts juries reach, Voir dire and jury selection | 1 Comment