Monthly Archives: November 2010

Jury duty and civic responsibility

An Indiana judge recently vented about low response rates for the summons to jury duty. In doing so, he hit on a pet point we make at the Jury & Democracy Project–that jury duty is like voting. Here’s a quick … Continue reading

Posted in Social/political impact of juries, Summoning juries | 3 Comments

The Jury’s Power in a Democracy as a Means of Holding Elected Officials Accountable

Most criminal juries convict the accused, but the person going to jail usually has the status of simply “fellow citizen.” Jurors are, after all, of one’s peers, in the looser sense of that word. But when a jury convicts a … Continue reading

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Second-guessing verdicts: Guantanamo

So, the lone holdout in the first civilian trial of a Guantanamo detainee has resulted in a mixed verdict–a conviction on a charge that could end up as a life sentence, but acquittal on 224 murder counts (284 in all). … Continue reading

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How do minority voices fare on juries?

Small groups, including juries, are stereotyped as exerting tremendous pressure on minority opinion. And while it is true that initial majorities tend to prevail, that in itself is neither surprising nor a sign of trouble, in itself. In fact, research … Continue reading

Posted in Deliberation on juries, Verdicts juries reach | Leave a comment